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This ROI calculator (return on investment) calculates an annualized rate of return using exact dates. Also known as ROR (rate of return), these financial calculators allow you to compare the results of different investments. More below...»

Do you have 3 minutes for your future?
Then try this Retirement Planning Calculator. It solves for multiple unknowns and creates a cash flow schedule.
Need to calculate a rate of return on multiple investments?
Check out our Internal Rate of Return (IRR) Calculator. It supports irregular investment dates.

$ : mm/dd/yyyy
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Related: If you have multiple investments or withdrawals on different dates then use this internal rate of return calculator. An IRR calculation is an annualized ROI calculation when there are multiple cash flows.

As a side benefit of this calculator's date accuracy, you can also use it to do date math calculations. That is, it will find the date that is "X" days from the start date or given two dates, it will calculate the number of days between them.

Calendar Tip: When using the calendar, click on the month at the top to list the months, then, if needed, click on the year at the top to list years. Click to pick a year, pick a month and pick a day. Naturally you can scroll through the months and days too. Or you can click on "Today" to quickly select the current date.

If you prefer not using a calendar, single click on a date or use the [Tab] key (or [Shift][Tab]) to select a date. Then, as mentioned, type 8 digits only - no need to type the date part separators. Also, because the date is selected, you do not need to clear the prior date before typing. If mm/dd/yyyy is selected for the date format, for March 15, 2016, type 03152016.

What is ROI?

ROI or Return on Investment calculates the percentage gained or lost on an investment.

Enter the "Amount Invested" and the date the investment was made ("Start Date"). Enter the total "Amount Returned" and the end date.

You can change the dates by changing the number of days. Enter a negative number of days to adjust the "Start Date". Or as you change a date the "Number of Days" will update.

The results include the percentage gained or loss on the investment as well as the annualized gain or loss also expressed as a percent. The annualized return can be used to compare one investment with another investment.

Example: If you bought $25,000 worth of your favorite stock on January 2nd 2014 and sold it for $33,000 on June 7th 2015, you would have a gain of $8,000 which is 32%. The annualized gain is 21.5%.

Now, lets say you made a second investment on January 2nd, 2015. This time for $10,000 and you sold it for $11,000 on March 1st, 2015. The gain is only $1,000 or 10%. However, annualized the gain is 82.1%. Ignoring risk (which can be very dangerous), one would generally consider the latter investment to be better than the former.

Related: Saving for college? You may have more time than you think!

A final word about ROI/ROR financial calculators — because two different calculators may use different equations, don't compare the results from one ROI calculator for one investment with results from another calculator for a different investment. Use the same calculator to compare two different investments.

Do You Have 20 Seconds?
Please tell me how you use this calculator. Are you using it personally or professionally? What feature is important to you? If it didn't meet your needs, why? Your feedback will help me make improvements. Complete sentences aren't necessary! :)

59 thoughts on “roi-calculator

    • Thanks Margy. Glad you found it useful. Do you know about the IRR Calculator on this site? It is also an ROI calculator. The difference between the two is that the IRR calculates ROI when there are many investments and / or withdrawals.

    • That’s interesting. Sorry it doesn’t do the job for you. However, since you have provided no details about the calculation itself or the type of device you are using, it is impossible for me to either offer suggestions or attempt to fix what may be broken. Also, I assume that `*@me.com` is not your valid email address, it is also impossible for me to contact you privately to resolve any issues.

      Perhaps you’ll come back here and read this and you’ll update your comment with more details?

    • You’re welcome. Along these lines, there is another calculator on this site which may be useful. The IRR Calculator calculates an annualized return as well. The difference is, the IRR calc. allows the user to input multiple investments and withdrawals. This can be used to include subsequent investment and/or withdrawals during the term you are measuring the ROI. Also, you can use it to include multiple mutual funds and calculate an overall ROI.

      Perhaps knowing about it will come in handy for you someday.

  1. Used this calculator for an ROI but don’t get why the ROI is what it is. What is the formula for the ROI this calculator is using.

    • Very interesting use. I guess it depends on location and electric rates, but at this point, can someone switch just based on the economics?

  2. IMHO the calculator should not permit Annualized ROI on investment windows less than a year as is the ethical norm:

    According to the CFA Institute’s Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS),

    “Returns for periods of less than one year must not be annualized.”
    (Source: PROVISIONS OF THE GLOBAL INVESTMENT PERFORMANCE STANDARDS 5.A.4 [3])

    This is because an annualized rate of return over a period of less than one year is statistically unlikely to be indicative of the annualized rate of return over the long run.[4] Annualizing a return over a period of less than one year might be interpreted as suggesting that the rest of the year is most likely to have the same rate of return, effectively projecting that rate of return over the whole year.

    • I was not aware of this. However, (1) there is a big difference between an individual wanting to know an annualized return on one of their investments and a firm calculating an annualized return on a short term investment and using that ROI to promote their firm and products.

      (2) Additionally, it is important to be able to compare investments, and how does one compare them if they can’t be annualized?

      (3) I also believe I would have a lot of very upset people if I turned this feature off.

      What I’ve done though is edit your comment to provide a link back to the Institute’s site. And when this page is updated, I’ll probably add some details around this. It is a good point that one should be very careful about extrapolating. However, (4) I think it’s best not to hinder the tool but rather it is better to provide an education about its use and risk.

      Thank you for the comment. It is very much appreciated.

  3. Use ROI calculator associated with tracking watch list of stocks.
    Saves lots of time when compared to using hand calculator. Currently having problems trying to print out data due to information not being displayed on print out sheet. Strongly recommend seeking adds from Stock Broker firms to support your business. I’m not a broker just individual with a few stocks.
    In summary love your ROI Calculator!!

    • Thank you for your comment.

      First, I rolled out a change Monday that unfortunately broke printing on many calculators. I just rolled the change back and the problem appears to be fixed. If you try it, you may have to refresh/reload the page in your browser to make sure the change has downloaded. Thanks for letting me know.

      About the advertising. That’s tricky. The old site did have advertising and the income, while not nothing, was pretty low. Also, a lot of the advertising, to catch consumer’s attention, has become pretty obnoxious. I just hate the pop-ups that many sites now seem to be using. My hopes are, that I can eventually attract enough traffic to this site that I’ll be able to find a single sponsor that will pay slightly above market rates in order to have exclusive access to this site’s visitors and whose ads will be served directly from this site’s domain which means, I think, that an ad blocker won’t be able to block.

      I probably need to triple the unique visitors though – to about 300,000 / month.

  4. This calculator is the best ROI calculator on the internet. No question about it, its the very best! It is simple to use and easy to understand. Very intuitive interface and does exactly what I would expect. Does not overload the user with useless extraneous options. Thanks to the software engineer who fabricated this useful tool. Best regards, Pablo

  5. Dear sir,
    Please teach me.
    Am working in one financial sector.
    While am facing a customer., he ask.

    We give : 3 Lac loan in
    ROI 23 %
    processing fee : 2 %

    CUSTOMER calculate :
    My company EMI monthly : 11,613

    11,613*36 = 4,18,068 – 3Lac
    = 1,18,068 ÷ 36
    =3279.6 / 3280

    Now customer ask what is the ROI
    And how the roi calculated to rupees.

    Regards
    Arun
    Mobile 94 87 227 587

    —————– —————- —————-
    Mean while how convert roi to rupees
    And rupees to roi .

    Give an example sum.

    Regards
    Arun

    • I will be happy to try to help, but I’m not clear on everything. I don’t know what “EMI” is for one thing, and for another, the questions are implied ones I think rather than being direct ones. Please ask direct questions.

      I’ll try to answer what I think I understand.

      The ROI is no different if a loan is in Ruppees or if it’s in dollars, or any other currency.

      To calculate an ROI on a loan, you can’t use this calculator, because if it for lump sum investments. Please use the IRR Calculator. An IRR is also an ROI calculation. The difference it, the IRR Calculator works with a cash flow stream – in your case, that would be the loan payments.

      If you have any follow-up questions, please do NOT reply to the email you get. Rather, come back to the website and continue to post questions in the comment area. This way everyone benefits from the discussion and I might save some typing. Thanks!

  6. I made a lump sum investment more than 23 years ago and wanted to see what the annualized rate of return was. Your calculator worked great. It was easy, fast and I am confident, accurate. Thank you!

  7. I’m trying to understand the ROI calculation.
    I work in the energy conservation industry.
    So I created a simple hypothetical example so I could ‘follow along’
    I put in an investment of $1,000,000 to purchase a widget to save energy. I determined the annual $ savings to be $250,000.
    The life of the widget is 15 years … therefore I save a total of $3,750,000 over the 15 year life. This is a gain of $2,750,000 over the 15 yrs
    I divide the $2,750,000 by 15 and that by the original investment, I get 18% annual return. But the calculator above says like 9% and change.

    I’m a little financially challenged with some of this, but understand some concepts. I’m trying to solidify this so I don’t have to constantly revisit this.

    • Good question. A couple of things…

      The formula you are using is calculating a gross return and allocating an equal portion of the return over the 15 years. That’s not the same thing as an annualized return.

      Additionally, this ROI calculator is to be used for a single investment followed by a single return on that investment at some point in the future. That to say, the return realized from the investment is not available until the day the investment matures or is liquidated. So the return is going to be lower than an investment that grosses the same amount, but where the return can be utilized prior to the maturity date.

      To calculate a return on an investment that involves intermediate cash flows (either additional investment and / or withdrawals) one should use the IRR Calculator.

      Please try it. And if you have other questions, just ask.

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